Sadly, Utterly Abandoned Railways

My Uncle Bobby was a locomotive engineer on the former Baltimore & Ohio, now known as the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad, aka CSX. He retired several years ago, but his great love for all things train-related infected everyone in the family. It’s sad to see so many abandoned rail lines, but there’s also something innately compelling, something that draws me to these forlorn, derelict pieces of history. Sometimes I need to immerse myself in what was and is no longer.

Abandoned Railway Cutting in Otley by TJ Blackwell

This overgrown stone bridge once spanned a twin-track section of the former railway branch line connecting Otley and Pool to Arthington, Burley and Menston. The route of the trackbed makes for a great walk at this time of year; full of greenery and wildlife amid the crumbling railway remains. Photo by TJBlackwell

Abandoned Rail Crossing, West Hickory, Burton, Texas by Patrick Feller on Flickr

Abandoned Rail Crossing, West Hickory, Burton, Texas by Patrick Feller on Flickr

Abandoned railway bridge over Ziegenhalser Biele by Mohrau

Abandoned railway bridge over Ziegenhalser Biele by Mohrau

Abandoned Railroad Right-of-Way through Brenham, Texas by Patrick Feller on Flickr

Abandoned Railroad Right-of-Way through Brenham, Texas by Patrick Feller on Flickr

 

Railway bridge over Steine in Tuntschendorf by JanSuchy

Abandoned railway bridge over Ścinawka (Stěnava, Steine) in Tłumaczów (Tuntschendorf), Silesia, Poland by JanSuchy

 

Monroe County Indiana abandoned railway trestle by Vladimir Menkov

A wooden railway trestle (and adjacent embankment) on an abandoned railway line running parallel to S. Victor Pike in Perry Township, Monroe County, Indiana. The photos are taken somewhere near Victor Pike’s crossing with W. Tramway Rd. A metal tag on a structural elment has the brand name “Osmose” (maker of treated wood) and the date 1980. by Vladimir Menkov

Abandoned railway bridge between Krásný Jez and Ležnice (view from the north). by JanSuchy

Abandoned railway bridge between Krásný Jez and Ležnice (view from the north). by JanSuchy

Aerial photograph showing the historic truss bridge, the Santa Fe Railroad Bridge, and the newer U.S. Highway 60/83 bridge crossing the Canadian River. From State of Texas DOT

Aerial photograph showing the historic truss bridge, the Santa Fe Railroad Bridge, and the newer U.S. Highway 60/83 bridge crossing the Canadian River. From State of Texas DOT

Abandoned railroad trestle north of Cloudcroft, New Mexico, USA by Luke Jones

Abandoned railroad trestle north of Cloudcroft, New Mexico, USA by Luke Jones

Abandoned railroad trestle on Guste Island in Madisonville, LA

Abandoned railroad trestle on Guste Island in Madisonville, LA

Abandoned railroad that connects Coles Bay to Grumantbyen, Svalbard by Ckt2packet

Abandoned railroad that connects Coles Bay to Grumantbyen, Svalbard by Ckt2packet

Abandoned train trestle somewhere in NY by siliconwafer on railroad.net

Abandoned train trestle somewhere in NY by siliconwafer on railroad.net

Another abandoned train trestle somewhere in NY by siliconwafer on railroad.net.

Another abandoned train trestle somewhere in NY by siliconwafer on railroad.net.

Road closed. This viaduct is on McKay Road in south Shelbyville, Indiana is very familiar to me. We used to take this road all the time to bypass the traffic on St.Rd. 44. I wonder if the trains still run on the track above? My wonderful friend, Sandra Becraft took this picture for me! Thank you!

Road closed. This viaduct on McKay Road in south Shelbyville, Indiana is very familiar to me. We used to take this road all the time to bypass the traffic on St.Rd. 44. I wonder if the trains still run on the track above? My wonderful friend, Sandra Becraft took this picture for me! Thank you!

That’s all for now. I spend too many hours looking at images – they suck me in and steal my time! Until the next episode of Sadly, Utterly Abandoned…

 

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13 thoughts on “Sadly, Utterly Abandoned Railways

  1. There is nothing better than laying in bed and hearing the train whistle from just down the street, your Dad usually yells, there’s your train. Seeing abandoned things and places makes me very sad. Thanks for sharing. Love you,Sandy

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    • Is that akin to yelling barge every time one comes into view on the river? LOL I used to love hearing the train running through Morristown and if the whistle blew extra long you knew Uncle Bobby was on it. Sometimes, on a perfect day, you could hear it a few miles out and we’d have time to hop on our bikes and make it to the tracks in time to see him wave out the window.

      It is sad to see so much gone to waste. I can’t help but wonder what happened and the answer, I’m sure, was a lack of money. *heavy sigh*

      I love you, too! xoxo

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  2. Melissa, do you remember in Shelbyville, right down from my house actually, Shelbyville has a railway that isn’t in use anymore. The Vidock is what people call it. They closed the Vidock a few years back because it would flood and people continuously would move barrier and drive through it and usually flooded their car. They build a culdasac in front of it to close it off. I will get a photo of it for you, if i can get close enough. I bet your husband remembers ” The Vidock”, thanks for sharing a heartfelt story and woderful pictures. Xxoo

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    • I know exactly where you’re talking about – and all this time I didn’t know you lived in that area! I didn’t know they closed the viaduct. Jimmie said he called it a “vidock,” too! I guess I was never listening closely enough to him to hear what he was saying. 😉 I would love a picture of it! Thank you!

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  3. I would walk down there now but its raining, I will tomorrow for you. Also, wow guess I have been pronouncing and spelling it incorrectly for sometime. Gosh, it’s awesome to have an author for a friend..;) I always keep your book on my “carousel” on my Kindle Fire, so I can brag that my friend is “an author”.. 😉 That reminds me, I never carried over the second one to this Kindle….better get on that, so I can read it! Goodness.

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    • No worries, dear! Just whenever the mood strikes to take a walk. 🙂 Well, J called it that, too, so it must be an S-ville thing! I just have a great love for words, but I think you can tell that by now. LOL

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  4. Pingback: Rusting Railways, Crumbling Pakistan | verum intus, fulsi vacuus

  5. I too feel that sadness when I see abandoned railways. I live in northeast Ohio and we’ve lost our share of tracks over the years. One, near me, used to run under some small bridges and I used to stand on the bridge and watch. The last train that I saw go through there had a lot of bright yellow rail cars. Always wondered why so many and where they were going. That line has been gone for decades but at least it’s now a hike and bike trail for the Metroparks. I wish it was still a railroad. Again, sad.

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