Sadly, Utterly Abandoned Ships & Boats

The first two images are wholly fascinating to me. A Civil War romance tale could be easily woven around this lost and abandoned ship.

Further down, the image of the ship in the middle of what appears to be a desert is bizarre, yet scary. How did the vast Aral Sea just dry up? I don’t know, but it’s happened repeatedly throughout the many millenniums of this planet’s existence.  You can see that many of the vessels in this Sadly, Utterly Abandoned set have become beached by receding waters. Who knows when the tides will turn and all bodies of water that have slowly been ebbing away will be fully restored? No one on Earth can predict the future.

Hurricane Isaac uncovers more of the mystery Civil War ship at Gulf Shores, Alabama. Photos by Meyer Vacation Rentals.

2012, Hurricane Isaac uncovered more of the mystery Civil War ship at Gulf Shores, Alabama. Photos by Meyer Vacation Rentals. Historic details by Paul Conner at The Daily Caller.

Close up of the mystery Civil War ship at Gulf Shores, Alabama. Photos by Meyer Vacation Rentals. Historic details by Paul Conner at The Daily Caller.

Close up of the mystery Civil War ship at Gulf Shores, Alabama. Photos by Meyer Vacation Rentals. Historic details by Paul Conner at The Daily Caller.

Abandoned in Shiga. Photo by rockriver on Flickr.

Abandoned in Shiga. Photo by rockriver on Flickr.

I say cut the line and let a storm take this poor boat to its watery grave. Photo by RossTucknott on flickr.

I say cut the line and let a storm take this poor boat to its watery grave. Photo by Ross Tucknott on flickr.

Abandoned boat at Velator Quay near to Wrafton, Devon, Great Britain by Philip Halling on Geograph.org.uk

Abandoned boat at Velator Quay near to Wrafton, Devon, Great Britain by Philip Halling on Geograph.org.uk

This sad little boat is hidden away in a small creek off Fishbourne Channel. The boats and buildings of Dell Quay are in the background. This area can be flooded at high tide and the number of footbridges over the creeks suggest the number of different routes available in a contingency. Near to Apuldram, West Sussex, Great Britain. Photo by Simon Carey on Geograph.org.uk.

This sad little boat is hidden away in a small creek off Fishbourne Channel. The boats and buildings of Dell Quay are in the background. This area can be flooded at high tide and the number of footbridges over the creeks suggest the number of different routes available in a contingency. Near to Apuldram, West Sussex, Great Britain. Photo by Simon Carey on Geograph.org.uk.

Abandoned boat on Ulva, near to Oskamull, Argyll and Bute, Great Britain. Photo by Nicholas Mutton on geograph.org.uk

It appears the captain of this pirate vessel abandoned ship. Maybe a mutiny? Perhaps he was forced to walk his own plank. Ulva, near to Oskamull, Argyll and Bute, Great Britain. Photo by Nicholas Mutton on Geograph.org.uk

Fishing boat aground at Caol between Loch Linnhe and The Narrows, Highland, Scotland. Ben Nevis, seen in the background. Photo by Greg Fitchett on Geograph.org.uk.

Fishing boat aground at Caol between Loch Linnhe and The Narrows, Highland, Scotland. Ben Nevis, seen in the background. Photo by Greg Fitchett on Geograph.org.uk.

This view of Ettrick Bay beach, taken from the cafe car park, shows an abandoned, wrecked boat. Ettrick Bay near to Kildavanan, Argyll And Bute, Great Britain. Photo by Iain McKenzie on Geograph.org.uk.

This view of Ettrick Bay beach, taken from the cafe car park, shows an abandoned, wrecked boat. Ettrick Bay near to Kildavanan, Argyll And Bute, Great Britain. Photo by Iain McKenzie on Geograph.org.uk.

Abandoned boat along the river Isis. Iffley, Oxford, England. Photo by Danny Chapman on Flickr.

Abandoned boat along the river Isis. Iffley, Oxford, England. Photo by Danny Chapman on Flickr.

A sunken house, boat, or house boat in the bay of Pripyat, near Chernobyl. Photo by Timm Suess on Flickr.

A sunken house, boat, or house boat in the bay of Pripyat, near Chernobyl. Photo by Timm Suess on Flickr.

View of the Tugboat graveyard in Rossville, Staten Island, New York, New York. Photo by Joseph Kranak on Flickr.

View of the Tugboat graveyard in Rossville, Staten Island, New York, New York. Photo by Joseph Kranak on Flickr.

Point Reyes, Tamales Bay, Inverness, California. Photo by Orin Zebest on Flickr.

Point Reyes, Tamales Bay, Inverness, California. Photo by Orin Zebest on Flickr.

Photo taken at low-tide on 1/30/2010 of the wreck of the SS Monte Carlo near Coronado Shores, Coronado, California. The Monte Carlo was a 300 ft concrete-hulled ship originally launched as the McKittick in 1921 from Wilmington NC. In 1936, the ship was anchored 3 miles of the coast of Point Loma and served as a gambling and prositution ship, avoiding local laws as it was in international waters. On December 31, 1936, a storm broke the anchor lines, and the ship foundered near the shore and was abandoned by it's owners (supposedly, the mob). It's usually buried in the sand, but occasionally turns up in low tides after storms. Tent City, Coronado, California. Photo by Jamie Lantzy on Flickr.

Photo taken at low-tide on 1/30/2010 of the wreck of the SS Monte Carlo near Coronado Shores, Coronado, California. The Monte Carlo was a 300 ft concrete-hulled ship originally launched as the McKittick in 1921 from Wilmington NC. In 1936, the ship was anchored 3 miles of the coast of Point Loma and served as a gambling and prostitution ship, avoiding local laws as it was in international waters. On December 31, 1936, a storm broke the anchor lines, and the ship foundered near the shore and was abandoned by its owners (supposedly the mob). It’s usually buried in the sand, but occasionally turns up in low tides after storms. Tent City, Coronado, California. Photo by Jamie Lantzy on Flickr.

The Mary D. Hume steamer, abandoned at Gold Beach, Oregon, USA. Photo by Acroterion on Wikimedia Commons.

The Mary D. Hume steamer, abandoned at Gold Beach, Oregon, USA. Photo by Acroterion on Wikimedia Commons.

Orphaned ship in former Aral Sea, near Aral, Kazakhstan. Photo by  Staecker on Wikimedia Commons.

Orphaned ship in former Aral Sea, near Aral, Kazakhstan. Photo by Staecker on Wikimedia Commons.

Abandoned, sinking boats near to Salen, Argyll and Bute, Great Britain. Photo by Nicholas Mutton on Geograph.org.uk

Abandoned, sinking boats near to Salen, Argyll and Bute, Great Britain. Photo by Nicholas Mutton on Geograph.org.uk

Abandoned, sinking boats near to Merkadale, Highland, Great Britain. by Nicholas Mutton on Geograph.org.uk

Abandoned, sinking boats near to Merkadale, Highland, Great Britain. by Nicholas Mutton on Geograph.org.uk

Abandoned tugboat near Buras, Louisiana. Photo by Brian Dearth on Flickr.

Abandoned tugboat near Buras, Louisiana. Photo by Brian Dearth on Flickr.

The amusement park in the Albanian seaside resort town of Durres Abandoned paddle boat in Albania by Quinn Dombrowski on flickr.

Abandoned paddle boat at the amusement park in the Albanian seaside resort town of Durres in Albania.  Photo by Quinn Dombrowski on flickr.

Once a fine steam yacht, but by 2005, a mouldering wreck of a houseboat that was no longer watertight and had been largely abandoned. She looked beyond salvation and has probably now been scrapped. The location and direction are approximate. She was a fixed feature, seen in her entirety and surely worthy of a Geograph.Seahorse, West Mersea near to West Mersea, Essex, Great Britain. Photo by Chris Allen on Geograph.org.uk.

The Seahorse was once a fine steam yacht, but by 2005, a mouldering wreck of a houseboat that was no longer watertight and had been largely abandoned. West Mersea near to West Mersea, Essex, Great Britain. Photo by Chris Allen on Geograph.org.uk.

An abandoned yacht near to Lochdon, Argyll And Bute, Great Britain. Photo by Colin Kinnear on Geograph.org.uk.

An abandoned yacht near to Lochdon, Argyll And Bute, Great Britain. Photo by Colin Kinnear on Geograph.org.uk.

There were so many on the internet from which to choose, it was hard to pick just a few. Some were selected for their overall appeal, rather than just the intended subject. We live in an amazing world full of gorgeous vistas. 🙂

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