Hot Read Alert!

What Happens in London, by Julia Quinn is excellent!  I’m half-way through and find it extremely difficult to put down.  If you don’t have a copy, run–don’t walk–to your nearest bookstore and buy it.  It’s well-worth whatever it costs!  If you happen to know me, I’ll lend you my copy. 🙂

(And if you don’t agree that it’s an awesome story, I’m sticking my fingers in my ears so I can’t hear you (or covering my eyes so I can’t read your bad review)!)  😛

Write What You Know

I love writing historical romance; it’s what I know!  I love researching almost as much as writing.  My problem is knowing when to stop researching and get busy putting word to page.  Everything of a historical nature is so fascinating to me it’s hard to cut myself off. 🙂  When I’m reading someone else’s work and they use a word or object that isn’t true to the time, it pulls me out of the story quicker than someone yelling “free chocolate!”

Head Hopping

Otherwise known as an over-abundance of POV (point of view) changes.

I’m in the midst of reading a Regency (not Regency-set); however, had I known it was a straight-up Regency I wouldn’t have bought it.  That’s what I get for not paying attention to the spine of the book.  Now, just because it’s an old-school Regency doesn’t automatically mean Continue reading

Surf Report, May 9, 2010

Writer Unboxed blog member, Barbara Samuel, on Layering Depth of Character:

“I’ll begin with a character bio, third person, interviewing her, but not in the usual ways. Alison Hart (Jennifer Greene) once posted a trick she uses, which is to look inside the purse or glove box of a character, or both. I do both. I also like to see the inside of the car—is it messy or tidy? My car usually looks like someone is moving—books and canvas grocery bags and change scattered all over the floors. My partner has tools and running clothes of various weights and dog clutter from his side business. Continue reading

Ahhh…Research!

How do you get motivated?

For me, it’s digging into research. It’s been a long time since I wrote a pirate story and I’ve lost some of my familiarity with tallships.  Pirate Ship I’ve recently discovered I can’t write my story and leave blanks to fill in later–there’d be way too many blanks.  I also need to find some pirate romances to read to get me in the right frame of mind.  It’s difficult to switch from a Regency to the early 18th century, too.  Clothing, figures of speech, political atmosphere, etc. bring the story to life–I need to research those things, as well.  The next scene in my wip is almost ready.  Today’s research will see me through this week’s writing.

And if I haven’t said this before–I love researching almost as much as writing.  🙂

Lis’Anne

Formatting a Romance Manuscript

Update 4/16/13: It’s now acceptable to use italics and other “smart” features of all the Microsoft Word versions, unless otherwise noted by the agent or editor one is submitting to. The basic rule of thumb is, 1″ margins all around, exactly 25 lines per page, start each new chapter 1/3 of the way down a new page. Page breaks at the end of each chapter help to keep them intact no matter how much editing is done to each. 🙂 Continue reading

Developing Character Characteristics

This is probably one of the most difficult things for me to do. In the past I’d simply start writing and the characters came to life, the plot  magically developed, and the story came together without any effort.  I wrote without focusing on any single element I’ve since been taught must be a part of a writer’s checklist. Continue reading